Thursday, April 03, 2008

Toseland's style praised by someone, criticized by others.


Toseland's debut in MotoGp has surprised riders as well commentators for his ability to adapt to a totally new bike and riding technique. While moving from 250 to 800cc is certainly less traumatic today than in the past, for WSBK riders MotoGp is still very different to what they are used to. Regardless since the last winter tests "Giacomino" Toseland has proved to be totally comfortable with his M1, to the point that only his Yamaha top speed seemed to be the limit factor in the first two races of the season. If in the straights, he has been relegated in holding slipstreams of other faster bikes, oppositely he has been very aggressive overtaking other riders going into the turns. We, MotoGp enthusiasts, have been delighted by his breathtaking maneuvers but he has definitely upset if not frightened other riders.
If touching or hitting other competitors is, to a certain degree, something normal in Superbike, we cannot claim the same for MotoGp. Every time it happens fans are very quick in finding the past actions, or skeletons in riders closets. So, today I read that Capirossi and Vermeulen have vented their criticism toward Toseland abrupt passing in the first two rounds of the season, with Loris claiming that if it should happened again he will find himself among the spectators! Indeed Vermuelen's experience must have been quite unpleasant since his leather suit got somehow ripped during the regrettable contact. Another rider suffering Toseland's roughness was Lorenzo, who if certainly astonished by Toseland's move, didn't complain too much especially after the incredible performance at his first race in Qatar. On his end, Toseland has not been apologetic for his moves, stating that he has not choice if not to pass on the brakes. In my opinion his moves are certainly very dangerous and in the long run could take out some riders out. Yes, he is passing on the brakes, but only a few feet away from reaching the apex, while the other rider is almost on the point to accelerate again while looking at the exit of the turn. While his move is still acceptable, I do recognize that the other rider will realize that Toseland is taking his inside only when his body and/or bike get hit or brushed by the English rider.
Unfortunately to win a racer has to get to the border line of what is acceptable or not, gambling with a potential crash or victory at every turn during the most critical moments of the race. Capirossi, who I esteem as a stout rider, has some famous skeletons too in his career as shown in the following video.

14 comments:

Jimmy said...

I don't know what Loris is complaining about, he's a raving lunatic!

According to one TV commentator, Toseland and Edwards had the highest corner speed of anyone on track. I reckon this means Toseland has no option but to pass where he has an advantage, since the steel-spring Yamaha is so slow on the straights. (He's supposed to be getting the air-spring engine next time out.)

Do you think the other riders might be taking lines that compromise the corner speed so they can get the power down, while the Tech 3 boys have to maintain as much corner speed as possible?

Alessandro Matteucci aka Alex 555 said...

I think that it has to do with the Yamaha engine, the way it rotates internally. Supposedly it gives the rider more stability under heavy braking, so higher entrance speed approaching corners. Also, in cornering a lighter feeling allows riders in "arching" more versus "squaring off". In the last couple years the extra corner speed has been really an edge for Yamaha even though it didn't translate in a real supremacy

Jimmy said...

Well, Yamaha seem to have arguably the best motorcycle out there this year, so they must have a good mix of power and agility. It'll be interesting when Tech 3 get the pneumatic-valve engine.

johng said...

Max Biaggi once said, "this is motorbike racing, not ballroom dancing." Personally, I think Toseland's riding has been simply aggressive racing and taking what is available to him when he can take it. Passing in Motogp is getting more difficult and if and when an opening happens, one has to act or lose it.

Anyway, I sure am glad racing is in full swing again and I do hope James T. doew well. This is a big oppertunity for him and he is very committed.

Best wishes Alex!

Almos said...

Talking aggressive racing... Did you guys see the WSBK Race 1 at Valencia? What you think about Checa???

Alessandro Matteucci aka Alex 555 said...

I have not watched the race but after reading about about it, I don't feel to criticize Checa. Last weekend he had an amazing weekend, totally at home with his Honda and taking down the leader of the race seems to be more an accident than anything else. Supposedly in both races he was the protagonist over several amazing overtakings, and we know that in motorcicle racing a small mistake often leads to a crash. Also they were in the last few laps and I am sure that lines and brake markers had become very aggressive leaving "less room" for passing. Anyhow the worst part is that the Neukirchner ended up with a broken collarbone.
Valencia highlights race 1

Jimmy said...

The trouble was that Checa was lapping much faster than Neukirchner and caught him on the last lap, so it's not like they were racing closely and Checa went for a gap. Checa just appeared suddenly out of nowhere and made a big lunge. I wasn't impressed.

Alessandro Matteucci aka Alex 555 said...

Before watching the video, I was under the impression that Neukirchner had been t-boned, indeed Checa took the inside of the turn that the Suzuki rider had left open while trying to make it to the end in the fastest fashion. Unfortunately Checa low-sided criss crossing the other rider line. Going back, I am sure that Checa would have approached the passing in a different manner, but, as Jimmy pointed out, it was the last turn! Also, it's my opinion that it's very risky to pass much slower riders going into a turn because they will end up "suggesting" brake and turn points too aggressive for the faster incoming rider.

johng said...

Alex, as you and Rob pointed out to us in class, the responsibility of the overtake falls on the overtaker. Checa was the faster rider at that point, but I think he was at the apex too fast and maybe braking too long into the turn. If it had been only he alone it would have been only his problem, but to take out what would have the race winner was what I feel, a very bad mistake, especially for a rider of his caliber and experience.

Best wishes.

DaniceLuvr said...

You can't please everyone lol

Boy Goerge said...

If you don't want to possibly crash then stay out of the race. A good rider has to be aggressive and take chances to win.

Forrest Gump said...

Hey, it's a race. Things happen, People take chances, something they crash.

Rick James said...

It's racing accidents happen. People fall down sometimes.

miki said...

The Motorbike information on Yamaha, Kawasaki, Honda, Aprilia, Suzuki,Ducati, Harley Davidson, Motorbike Station, Helmet, Accessories,Motorbike Specs,Bike Trader,Motorbike Engine,Motorbikepics,Motorbike Custom, Motorbike Games,Motorbike Wallpapers download and more variety of The Motorbike etc.
http://themotorbike.blogspot.com
http://themotorbike.blogspot.com
http://themotorbike.blogspot.com
http://themotorbike.blogspot.com
http://themotorbike.blogspot.com
http://themotorbike.blogspot.com
http://themotorbike.blogspot.com
http://themotorbike.blogspot.com
http://themotorbike.blogspot.com
http://themotorbike.blogspot.com